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The Collie


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The Collie, whether long-haired or short-haired, is a very gentle and affectionate dog. It is the ideal companion for the family, especially considering its great tolerance with children. Today it is one of the most appreciated dogs in the world, especially thanks to the famous Lassie character.

Origin
Great Britain
Size
56 to 61 cm for the male and 51 to 56 cm for the female

Weight
60 to 70 lbs for males and 50 to 65 lbs for females

Average life expectancy
12 to 15 years old

Poil
There are two varieties of Collieys, which are distinguished only by their hair type: the Longhair Collie and the Shorthair Collie.

The long-haired variety has a rough, very dense coat with a soft, compact undercoat. The mane and collar are very abundant.

The shorthaired variety has a flat, harsh coat with a dense undercoat.

Color
The three recognized colors are:

Sable (from light gold to dark mahogany);
Tricolour (predominantly black with tan spots on the head and limbs);
Bluebird blue (predominantly light, silvery blue with black marbling and dark tan spots).
All coat types must have white markings on the collar, breastplate, legs and tip of tail.

Collie Feeding
Collie’s more gourmet than big eater. In fact, he can be inclined to be “thin-mouthed” and to sulk over his bowl. If this is the case, it is probably because he lacks exercise.

Since they have a poor appetite, Collie Collies generally don’t beg for food. Collie should not be fed a diet that is too rich, otherwise it will become overweight. As an adult, one meal a day is enough for the Collie.

Please note
The amount and type of food the Collie eats depends on his weight, age, health and level of physical activity.

Collie behaviour and traits
The Collie has a deeply sweet and gentle character. Sensitive, he can’t stand environments where there is a lot of tension and arguments. Protective and tolerant with children, it is an excellent family companion.

The Collie is very affectionate and is extremely attached to its masters. If he is left alone too often, he will become unhappy and could develop destructive behaviour (chewing objects, digging, excessive barking, etc.).

It is a friendly dog as much with strangers as with other animals. He will be shy only if he is poorly socialized at a young age. He is excellent at alerting by his barking, but he will welcome intruders rather than threaten them.

Born to work and please his owners, the Collie is intelligent and easy to train. Beware, this dog is known for its great sensitivity. He can’t stand brutality and injustice. It is therefore important that his education is carried out with gentleness and calm. Ideally, corrections should be made verbally and not physically so that the dog does not become nervous. The Collie is very receptive when he is respected and praised.

Originally a sheepdog, the Collie is active. He loves to run and has excellent agility skills. A long walk a day is enough for most mature Colleys, while puppies need to exercise more.

Shorthaired Collies (see photo below) are generally more energetic, athletic and agile. This variety is often the one that has retained its working instincts the most. Long-haired Colleys tend to be calmer and more reserved.

Collie Grooming
Collie maintenance is easier than you might think. Long-haired dogs should be brushed three times a week to remove dead hairs and avoid knots. During the moulting period, brushing should be daily.

For the short-haired variety, brushing once or twice a week is enough to keep the dog looking good. Due to the Collie’s very dense undercoat, seasonal shedding and hair loss are very important.

It is advisable to accustom the Collie puppy to brushing at a very young age, especially on the thighs, as he is a great shy dog. It is also a good way to quickly establish himself as the leader and to avoid any dominant behaviour.

For more information, see Hygiene and grooming the dog.

Common Health Problems in Collie Dogs
The Collie is a hardy and very robust dog. However, he is predisposed to Collie Eye Anomaly (AOC), a hereditary disease that is particularly widespread in the breed (30 to 40% of subjects are affected on average). The Collie is also prone to the following health problems:

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA);
Hip dysplasia;
Genetic abnormality in the MDR1 gene (which creates drug sensitivity);
Dysplasia of the retina;
Hearing disorders;
Epilepsy.
*Collie is particularly prone to

Collie grooming
Collie maintenance is easier than you might think. Long-haired dogs should be brushed three times a week to remove dead hairs and avoid knots. During the moulting period, brushing should be daily.

For the short-haired variety, brushing once or twice a week is enough to keep the dog looking good. Due to the Collie’s very dense undercoat, seasonal shedding and hair loss are very important.

It is advisable to accustom the Collie puppy to brushing at a very young age, especially on the thighs, as he is a great shy dog. It is also a good way to quickly establish himself as the leader and to avoid any dominant behaviour.

For more information, see Hygiene and grooming the dog.

Common Health Problems in Collie Dogs
The Collie is a hardy and very robust dog. However, he is predisposed to Collie Eye Anomaly (AOC), a hereditary disease that is particularly widespread in the breed (30 to 40% of subjects are affected on average). The Collie is also prone to the following health problems:

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA);
Hip dysplasia;
Genetic abnormality in the MDR1 gene (which creates drug sensitivity);
Dysplasia of the retina;
Hearing disorders;
Epilepsy.
*Collie is particularly prone to hip dysplasia and eye damage. Require the breeder to see X-rays and screening tests of the puppy’s parents for hip dysplasia and eye defects.

In addition, avoid breeding two robin-coated puppies, as on average one out of every four puppies will be born blind.

Is Collie suitable for you?
Housing
The Collie can live in an apartment (with outings several times a day), but will prefer a house with a fenced backyard.
Ideally, he should have plenty of space to exercise.
Family situation
All family situations are suitable for the Collie.
Note that it is very compatible with the presence of young children and is suitable for the elderly.
Availability
The Collie Master must be available to devote several hours a week to the walk.
His master must be active, as he is a dog that needs a lot of exercise.
Since this breed does not tolerate solitude, its owner must be someone who is present and attentive.
Please note the following
In general, the Collie has retained strong sheepdog instincts. Lacking training, some Colleys will attempt to chew the ankles of running children in order to direct them, as if they were sheep. To prevent this from becoming a habit, this possible behaviour should be prohibited as soon as it occurs.

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